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Friday 18th May 8:00pm - 10:30pmBuy Tickets

Mistletone presents The Weather Station with special guests Darren Hanlon and James Kenyon.

Toronto’s Tamara Lindeman aka The Weather Station is one of Canada’s biggest rising stars. Her most recent self-produced, self-titled album has received unanimous critical acclaim from Pitchfork, MOJO, NPR, The New Yorker and many more, and has been nominated for a Juno Award. With her new album, Lindeman reinvents her songcraft with a vital new energy, framing her prose-poem narratives in bolder musical settings. It’s an emotionally candid statement – a work of urgency, generosity and joy – that feels like a collection of obliquely gut-punching short stories. The Weather Station’s previous album ‘Loyalty’ garnered a Polaris Prize nomination and was hailed by FADER as “the best folk album of the year.” It earned praise from The Guardian, Uncut, and MOJO among many others, who celebrated its delicate, carefully worded verse, filled with double meanings, ambiguities, complex metaphors, and rich details of the everyday. 

Darren Hanlon grew in a place described in tourist brochures as: “the town that saved Queensland”. The grandiose statement refers to the discovery of gold in Gympie in 1867. The house overlooking the river in the Southside of the regional town contained his parents, his sister and their scant record collection but it seemed the two albums played continually were Kenny Rogers' ‘Greatest Hits’ and Slim Dusty's ‘This is Your Life’ which they’d all listen to from their rooms at bedtime. “We might even get to hear side 2 if dad stayed awake long enough to get out of bed and turn it over,” he remembers.

James Kenyon was born in South Australia but now lives in sunny Melbourne and is fast gaining a reputation as one of Australia's best new songwriters. His latest album ‘Imagine you are Driving’ (2016) received four star reviews in both The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald, while Radio National’s Inside Sleeve said ‘placing him amongst song-writers such as Paul Kelly and Don Walker is no exaggeration.’